Happiness is the highest from of health

Reduce Sodium In The Diet

Sodium is a component of the common salt that we consume in foods. Salt is a chemical compound made up of 40 % of sodium and 60% of chloride and is by far the biggest dietary contributor of sodium. Different varieties of salt are available but the composition of the salt remains the same. One teaspoon of salt contains 2300 milligrams of sodium. However, it is also naturally found in many foods – although in much lesser amounts than the foods in which salt is added. Today, then processed and packaged foods are largely the contributors of the high sodium levels in the diet.

The American Heart Association recommends not more than 2300 milligrams of sodium per day (1 teaspoon of salt). However, the ideal limit as per them is no more than 1500 milligrams per day. Most of us eat more than the recommended limit. Keeping the intake of sodium within recommended levels is a part of a balanced and healthy eating diet.

When there is more sodium than required by the body, the kidneys flush the excess by making more urine. When kidneys are not able to flush out the excess sodium it accumulates in fluid in between the cells. Sodium pulls extra water and increases the volume of the fluid and blood. As the blood volume increases the heart has to work harder and also puts a pressure on the blood vessels. Over a period of time this can stiffen the blood vessels leading to hypertension (high blood pressure), heart attack, stroke or heart failure. High blood pressure can also damage the kidneys leading to kidney failure over a period of time.

Hypertension has become a lifestyle disease today. One in three adult Indians suffers from hypertension today. And what’s more – even children can develop it. A sedentary lifestyle with little or no physical activity coupled with unhealthy eating patterns are major contributors for hypertension. Most people today are unaware that they suffer from hypertension (a repeatedly elevated blood pressure 130/80 mm of Hg).

To watch your sodium intake here are a few tips to follow:

  • Avoid processed and packaged foods: Canned, processed, and frozen foods contain high amount of sodium in them. Avoid sauces, pickles, mayonnaise, ready to eat soups, canned vegetables, processed cheese and breads as these foods contain hidden sodium in them. Buy unsalted nuts or seeds. Compare the nutritional labels of the product you are buying with low sodium content per serving. If a nutritional label says sodium free, light sodium, low sodium or reduced sodium it means the following: a sodium free food should contain less than 5 milligrams sodium per serving, light means 50 percent less sodium than the regular version, reduced sodium means 25 percent less sodium than the regular version. Hence, make it a habit to read the nutritional labels when purchasing the food to avoid the high sodium intake consequences.
  • Cooking: While preparing or cooking the food use onions, garlic, lemon juice, herbs, spices, vinegar in place of extra salt to enhance the taste of food. Avoid usage of salt while cooking rice, rotis, parathas, pasta etc. Grilling, sautéing, and roasting cooking techniques bring out the natural flavor of the food and hence will reduce the need to add salt. Incorporating potassium rich foods like bananas, tomatoes, oranges, potatoes and sweet potatoes, white beans, will help to reduce the effect of sodium and also help in reducing the blood pressure.
  • Be mindful of what you order at restaurants: At restaurants ask if the dishes you are ordering can be made using minimum salt. Request for a salad with the dressing on the side as the dressings contain high sodium content. Avoid foods that contain soy sauce, ketchup, mustard etc. Do not add extra salt to the dish you have ordered. While eating pizza opt for less cheese, pepperoni or barbeque sauce, etc. Eat pasta with red sauce and vegetables instead of creamy cheese, bacon or sausage. In sandwiches, avoid the filling with cheese, bacon, ham, mayonnaise etc. Go for vegetable and avocado based fillings. Avoid eating Chinese meals as they contain lot of sodium in them.
  • Concentrate on fruits and vegetables: Eat a lot of fruits and vegetables as they are very low in sodium. Avoid canned or frozen fruits and vegetables. Before buying the canned variety look for no salt added version or reduced salt version.
  • Use the sodium allowance wisely: Instead of spending your sodium allowance on salty snacks and heavily processed foods, use small amounts of salt to enhance the flavor of foods like whole grains, legumes, and other healthy ingredients.

About Flatulence

Gas is formed when certain foods reach the large intestine without being completely and adequately digested. Once they arrive there bacteria go to work to digest them and in the process produce gas. This is a normal occurrence and in most cases intestinal gas is not a sign of an illness or disease. Today we eat more high fiber foods than our grandparents. Fruits and vegetables can be a source of intestinal gas, especially in people not used to eating a lot of them, or in the case of fructose intolerance.

The major cause of occasional excess gas is gas-producing foods. Most people are aware that beans are a major suspect, but there are other foods that will put you are risk including: apricots, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, onions, and mangoes.

Obviously, the first step in reducing flatulence is to avoid the foods that cause this problem for you. Keep in mind that people react differently to different foods.

Some people have found that corn, oats and any wheat-containing product give them gas. (I talk about food allergies in another article).

Many people are unaware that dairy products are causing their gas. In fact lactose intolerance is probably the major cause of bloating and excessive gas. It seem this author that complete avoidance of dairy products is the smartest solution.

There is a simple home test for lactose intolerance. Avoid ALL dairy and cheese products for ten days to see if your symptoms are alleviated. Then have some, if the gas and bloating returns you have your answer and you didn’t have to pay for any expensive blood tests. Acidophilus is often helpful for many people. The best acidophilus is the kind that needs to be refrigerated, so don’t fall for those cheap pills they sell in the chain drug stores.

Don’t fret there are cheddar cheeses that are lactose free. They are usually aged for two or more years. These hard cheeses should say lactose free on the label. I think the lactase-the sugar found in milk-is the culprit is broken down over time to become lactic acid.

If you are a person who swallows a lot of air you most likely are a person who also chews gum or a smoker. In addition, drinking carbonated beverages will add excess air into your system and thus promoting flatulence.

If you have chronic gas it is possible that you are suffering from something other than a simple case of flatulence. Check out articles on the following conditions: Celiac Disease, Diverticulitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Avoid activated charcoal tablets for several reasons. While activated charcoal tablets are effective for absorbing gas, they do however interfere with the absorption of any medication taken within two to three hours. This includes any prescription medications like the birth control pill, hormones, antibiotics and vitamin supplements. Those medications need to be effective.

Essential Foods for Runners

Cherries

Cherries are rich in a type of antioxidant known as anthocyanins. Antioxidants are useful for a variety of reasons, such as slowing the growth of cancerous tumors and maintaining healthy blood vessels. Plus, they are great to give a boost to athletic performance. For the athlete, a regular glass of cherry juice can help to reduce muscle soreness and the amount of strength loss.

Kale

Kale is one of the most antioxidant-rich vegetables, as well as containing high levels of calcium, iron and vitamins A, C and K. Plus, it contains useful anti-inflammatory properties. Adding kale to the diet can help to minimize issues with muscle damage related to daily exercise. Other anti-inflammatory foods that are useful for the runner include tomatoes, spinach, tuna, sardines, blueberries and strawberries.

Bananas

Bananas are a great pre-race or workout food for runners. It is rich in carbohydrates. A single large banana has no fat, 1 gram of protein, and 30 grams of carbohydrate. Plus, it is a useful source of potassium which is easily lost at the time of exercise through sweat. This light and soft fruit is easy to eat even when experiencing issues with pre-race nerves.

Oatmeal

Runners are best prepared for physical activity when at least 60% of their daily intake is sourced from carbohydrates. This helps to maximize the body’s ability to perform. A simple way to start the carbohydrate intake is with breakfast. A high-carb breakfast option is oatmeal, which has nearly 26 grams per serving. Plus, oatmeal is a low-glycemic index food and rich in fiber to give long-lasting energy.

Ways To Build Strong Bones

Avoid foods that cause osteoporosis

  • Gluten. For those who have an autoimmune disease or have a gluten sensitivity, gluten is the major contributor to bone loss. Therefore, if you have osteopenia or osteoporosis, you should be screened for gluten sensitivity. Cyrex Labs Array 3 is a blood test that can accurately identify gluten sensitivity.
  • Canned soda. The high phosphorus content in canned soda leads to the removal of calcium from the body.
  • Alcohol. Excessive alcohol interferes with the balance of calcium and the production of vitamin D, a vitamin essential for calcium absorption. Chronic heavy drinking also leads to hormone deficiencies. In men, it lowers testosterone and in women, estrogen.
  • High-sodium processed foods. Salt causes excessive calcium excretion through the kidneys.
  • Coffee. Over consumption of caffeine leaches calcium from the bones. Limit to two cups a day if you already have osteopenia or osteoporosis.

Eat plenty of foods that build strong bones

Most people believe that drinking more milk will help build strong bones. Unfortunately, long-term scientific studies have not been able to back up this theory. In fact, they found that countries with the highest milk consumption, including America, also have the highest rate of osteoporosis!

One of the reasons may be because the milk we consume these days is pasteurized and homogenized. These processes alter the milk’s natural chemistry and make it much harder to digest and absorb the nutrients.

Another reason is that besides calcium, there are other nutrients that are needed for building bone, like boron, chromium, copper, iodine, magnesium, manganese, selenium, silicone, and strontium. Merely consuming high amounts of calcium from milk will not contribute to strong bones.

So what kind of foods will give you the whole gamut of nutrients for making strong bones? The following are some that are particularly beneficial –

  • Vegetables
  • arugula
  • broccoli
  • collard greens
  • green beans
  • kale
  • okra
  • spinach
  • Swiss chard
  • tomatoes
  • turnips
  • watercress
  • Fruits
  • apricots
  • coconut
  • currants
  • figs
  • orange
  • Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds contain anti-nutrients like phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors which impede the digestion of vitamins and minerals. To overcome this, soak the raw nuts and seeds in warm, filtered water for up to 12 hours, depending on the type. Keep the bowl at room temperature and cover with a kitchen towel. Drain and rinse afterwards. Eat immediately or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

  • almonds (soak for 8-12 hours)
  • Brazil nuts (3 hours)
  • hazelnuts (8-12 hours)
  • sesame seeds (8 hours)
  • walnuts (4 hours)
  • Fish
  • canned Alaskan salmon with bones
  • canned sardines with bones
  • wild caught fish
  • Bone broth
  • made from organic, pastured-raised chicken, beef, bison, pork, veal, or wild caught fish bones
  • Others
  • bee pollen/propolis/royal jelly
  • cacao, raw
  • chlorella
  • Goji berries
  • seaweed such as agar, dulse, nori, kelp, kombu, or wakame

3. Make sure you get enough vitamin D and vitamin K2

Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium whereas vitamin K2 prevents calcium from being deposited into the wrong places. For example, it keeps it out of the kidneys where it would cause kidney stones, and out of blood vessels where it would cause heart disease. K2 makes sure calcium gets into all the right places – the bones and teeth – and lowers risk of fractures and cavities.

Vitamin D is made by our skin when exposed to sunlight. Most people do not get enough vitamin D through the diet – mainly oily fish, liver, eggs, and red meat. Therefore, if you do not spend much time outdoors or are concerned about skin cancer, consider taking a vitamin D3 supplement instead. Most people need about 5,000 I.U. a day to reach the optimal level of 50-80 ng/ml in the blood.

  • Food sources of vitamin K2 –
  • Fermented foods
  • natto, Japanese fermented soybeans
  • sauerkraut
  • kefir, fermented raw milk
  • Animal foods
  • butter from grass-fed cows
  • cheese, hard and soft
  • dark chicken meat from pasture-raised chickens
  • egg yolk, from pasture-raised chickens
  • fish eggs
  • organ meats from pasture-raised animals

Engage in weight-bearing and muscle-training exercises

Weight-bearing exercises are activities that make you move against gravity while staying upright. They help build bones and keep them strong. Examples include:

  • dancing
  • doing aerobics, both high and low impact
  • walking, jogging, or running on a treadmill or outside
  • jumping rope
  • climbing stairs or using a stair-step machine
  • using an elliptical machine

Muscle-training or resistance exercises are activities where you move your body, a weight, or some other resistance against gravity. Examples include:

  • lifting weights
  • using elastic exercise bands
  • using your own body weight, such as push-ups and chin-ups
  • doing functional movements, such as squats, which train the muscles to work the way they do in everyday tasks.

Vibration therapy involves standing on a mechanic vibrating plate such as the Power Plate. As the machine vibrates, it transmits energy to the body. It causes the muscles to contract and relax dozens of times each second with the aim of increasing circulation, muscle strength, and flexibility. Recent studies found that doing it for 10-20 minutes a day may help prevent and regain bone loss.

Yoga

Like weight training, yoga works by stressing the bone. When bone cells get stimulated through being compressed, twisted, or elongated, they produce more bone mass to resist the pressure, resulting in stronger bones. Yoga also helps to improve balance, muscular strength, range of motion, and coordination.

Pilates

Pilates is an exercise technique that conditions the entire body by strengthening the muscles in the stomach and the back, referred to as the “core”. Studies show that pilates helps build bone density, increase muscle strength, improve balance, flexibility, and posture.

If you already have osteoporosis or have had bone fractures, please consult with your doctor before engaging in any forms of exercise. Some movements may not be appropriate for your particular condition.

Consider Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT)

Bioidentical hormones are not synthetic hormones. They are exactly the same, down to the last atom, as those produced by our bodies. Hence, bioidentical hormones have been shown to have a much safer profile than the synthetic Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) drugs like Premarin, Prempro, and Provera, which elevate women’s risk of breast cancer, heart disease, and atherosclerosis (artery hardening).

BHRT for women usually combines estrogen as well as progesterone. It is, without doubt, a valid and viable option for protecting against osteoporotic fractures.

For men, testosterone replacement therapy is used for bone loss or osteoporosis. There have been concerns that there may be an increased risk of prostate cancer. However, multiple studies over the last 20 years have concluded that testosterone replacement therapy does not increase a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

If you are considering BHRT for osteoporosis, consult with a doctor who is knowledgeable and experienced with using bioidentical hormones. Therapy should be individualized and tailored to the specific needs and risk of the person.

Diet Drinks and Heart Concerns

Diet sodas or drinks refer to carbonated beverages that are sweetened with artificial sweeteners like aspartame, saccharin, sucralose or acesulfame-k. If you think about it, almost every popular soda brand on the market has a diet or a “light” version available. Technically they should be good for dieters as they contain no calories, and help to prevent sugar-related diseases, but evidence of these drinks being beneficial is completely non-existent.

Artificial sweeteners are what the word suggests: synthetic or fabricated. The main problem with these sweeteners is that they have a more intense flavour than real sugar. Over time, our taste buds get used to diet products and they have the same effect on the body than real sugar. Your body will crave sugar more, and this will result in higher insulin levels, which will result in your body increasing its fat storage.

The Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study monitored a group of women with an average age of 62 years. They found that among the 60,000 women who participated in the study, there was a clear relationship between cardiovascular problems and their consumption of diet drinks.

In a study of around 6,800 people aged between 45 and 85 years of age, it was found that diet soda was linked to a 67 percent increased risk of developing type II diabetes; data from two Harvard studies also showed that diet drinks raise the risk of diabetes in women, but not in men. Consuming diet drinks on a daily basis can increase the risk with as much as six percent with every serving.

Postmenopausal women – normally above the age of 50 years – are more prone to develop diabetes, a higher BMI and high blood pressure by consuming more than two diet drinks per day. They are also 50 percent more likely to die from cardiovascular disease compared to women who do not consume diet drinks. Researchers have also found a link between bone density and the consumption of sods – both regular and diet – by older women.

Metabolic syndrome refers to a group of risk factors that can significantly increase your chances of developing conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high glucose levels and accumulated fat around the waist. Metabolic syndrome is seen as having three or more of the following: low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure, abdominal obesity or body fat, high triglycerides and high fasting glucose.

A study by the American Diabetes Association found that diet soda drinkers showed a 36 percent increased risk of metabolic syndrome and a drastically increased risk of diabetes. So yes, diet drinks may not have any calories, but they don’t have any nutritional value either. When you consume diet drinks, the body will crave more sugar, elevating artificial sugar intake and increasing the risk of health problems.

Focus on Folate

Folate’s Function

Folate is needed in order to adequately produce red blood cells. Folic acid also works with B12 in reducing dangerous compounds in the body and for driving multiple metabolic processes. Folate is of the utmost importance to women of childbearing age, as folate is integral in the formation of the fetal brain and spinal cord during pregnancy.

Folate is found in green vegetables, such as spinach, asparagus, and broccoli (the word folate is derived from the word foliage). Like most B vitamins, folate is very easily destroyed by cooking and light, and folate levels decrease rapidly once the vegetables are harvested. The good news is that many foods are fortified with folic acid, an easily-metabolized and stable version of folate. Once serving of most fortified cereals contains your daily dose of folate. Lentils and other legumes such as pinto beans are also good sources.

Folic Acid Supplements

Women of childbearing age should consider taking a folic acid supplement. Birth defects caused by inadequate folate intake can occur before women even know they’re pregnant, and the damage is unfortunately irreversible. As soon as a woman becomes pregnant, her daily requirement for folate doubles and it may be difficult to meet this requirement through diet alone. Folic acid is a commonly recommended supplement during pregnancy and for women who may become pregnant.

Folic acid supplements are just like getting folate from your diet – they are one and the same and your body processes them the same. Most multivitamins sold in the U.S contain 400 mcg, which is the Recommended Dietary Allowance. Check the vitamin’s label to be sure it says 400 mcg or “100%” next to folic acid or folate. Another option is to take a simple folic acid supplement if you prefer.

Sonamasuri Hand Pounded Rice

Hand polished rice is pulled by hand, so that only the robust outer protection layer, the husk, is removed. It is edible and contains all of the nutrients as nature intended.It is hand pounded with a mortar and pestle and winnowed to produce pale, whitish rice. This kind of whole grain is a complex carbohydrate and bears a mild nutty flavor. It is full of fiber and may take longer to cook. However, with pressure cookers at hand; it is an easy task to convert hand pounded rice into instantly likable and nutritious food.

Benefits of consuming Sona Masuri hand pounded rice:

  • Low on the Glycemic Index, It takes a long time to digest making you feel fuller for longer thereby helping got keep hunger at bay
  • Presence of fiber aids digestion
  • The protein is absorbed quickly and is readily assimilated
  • Contains essential nutrients like Manganese, Tryptophan among others
  • Selenium in hand pounded rice reduces the risk of cancer of the colon
  • Presence of amino acids helps to reduce fatty liver
  • Reduces cholesterol and accelerates fat burning making you leaner
  • Reduces risk of cardiovascular diseases
  • Avoids spikes in sugar levels, It can be eaten by people with diabetes too

As you plan your diet combine Sona Masuri with your favorite dal to make a wholesome meal. It grown organically with no adulteration can do wonders for your health. Produced and grown by natural methods Sona Masuri is rich in proteins, vitamin B & vitamin E and iron along with several minerals.

A diet consisting of pastel white hand pounded will keep you physically and mentally healthy. Interestingly, Ayurveda suggests many rice based diet plans which are used to treat various imbalances in the body. Eating the right amount of natural hand pounded with your favorite accompaniment is a meal which is easily digestible and gives you essential amino acids – the building blocks of proteins. As your diet continues, you will observe a change in your body making you more active.

While this is an introduction to the advantages that hand pounded rice offers when included in your diet we would also like to hear from you on how hand pounded organic rice has helped you. Any interesting recipes that have enhanced the taste and were appreciated are welcome to be shared.

Complete Proteins With Foxtail Millets

Foxtail millets are available in the form of cereal, semolina or as flour. Foxtail millet is rich in smart carbohydrates and does not increase the blood sugar levels immediately after eating due to its rich dietary fibre.

Millets are not just the new fad for weight loss but have a wide range of health benefits that should be taken advantage of in today’s world. Millets, packed with nutrients, vitamins, minerals and organic compounds, can significantly boost human health in various ways.

  • Millets against Type-2 Diabetes

Millets are a rich source of magnesium, a mineral which is extremely important for starch digestion. Research finds that magnesium-rich whole grain consumption can help lower the risk of type-2 diabetes. So having an energetic morning with a bowl of millets cooked in milk is beginning your day with the right nutrition.

  • Millets against Heart Disease

The high fibre levels in millet are ideal for lowering cholesterol. It eliminates dangerous “bad cholesterol” (LDL) from the system while promoting the effects of “good cholesterol (HDL). Being a rich source of magnesium and potassium, it reduces blood pressure and acts as a vasodilator. Reducing your blood pressure and boosting your circulation is one of the best ways to protect your cardiovascular health.

  • Millets for Digestive Health and Detoxification

The rich fibre in millet moves along the gastrointestinal system to eliminate problems like constipation, flatulence, bloating, and cramping. This improves the nutritional retention and reduces chances of gastric ulcers. Proper digestion and elimination of waste help to improve your kidney, liver, and immune system health.

The antioxidants found in millet, neutralise free radicals and the beneficial catechins present can help rid the system of toxins by promoting proper excretion and neutralising enzymatic activity in the organs.

  • Millets in Cancer Prevention
  • Recent research has revealed fibre to be one of the best and easiest ways to prevent the onset of breast cancer. Also, one of the phytonutrients amply present in millets is lignans. Upon fermentation in the intestines by bacteria, they yield ‘enterolactone’, a product which is known to protect against some forms of breast cancers.
  • Millets in Asthma Prevention

Research has shown that millet can considerably improve the quality of life for people suffering from childhood asthma and can also prevent it from developing. It has been shown to reduce wheezing and asthma attacks in children who had large intakes of millet.

When purchasing millet in bulk or a packaged container, make sure of its freshness and that there is no moisture present. Always choose organic millets, free from chemical fertilisers and artificial sprays.

How to Enjoy Your Meals with Millet

  • Millet can be cooked as a breakfast porridge to which you can add nuts and fruits to make it more nutritious.
  • Millet flour can be proportionately added in bread and muffin recipes.
  • Cooked millet grains added to a tossed vegetable and chicken salad is a filling and a nutritionally complete meal.

Food Acids

  • Citric Acid: This is a natural preservative found primarily in citrus fruits. Limes and Lemons are the best sources of citric acid, followed by other citrus fruits and strawberries, tomatoes and pineapples. A great quantity of all the citric acid produced is contained in soft drinks and other beverages, where it boosts flavors and adds a slightly sour taste. Citric acid also acts as a preservative and flavor enhancer in foods, including frozen foods, meat products, canned vegetables, jams, gelatins, candies.
  • Malic Acid: This is a component of many of the foods that we eat daily; mainly contained in candies, diet sodas and other artificially sweetened drinks due to its ability in masking artificial flavors and alternative sweeteners. The food that is most famous for its high malic acid content is the apple. Other fruits with a very high concentration of the acid are lychees, peaches nectarines, cherries, tomatoes, bananas, mangoes, and strawberries.
  • Tartric Acid: This compound is naturally found in many plants, particularly in grapes, tamarinds, pineapples, potatoes, carrots and bananas. It is also one of the especial acids found in wine. Tartaric acid can be added to food when a sour taste is desired. Tartaric acids have a dual role of an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory which can help boost the immune system and promote overall wellness.
  • Acetic Acid: Acetic acid, also known as ethanoic acid, is a sour-tasting compound best known for the sour taste and pungent smell in vinegar, pickles, and sourdough bread. Its produced by fermenting and oxidizing ethanol and the distillation of wood. Acetic acid has many functions, but it is mostly used as a chemical reagent, fungicide, herbicide, and solvent in a variety of industries such as food, agriculture, cosmetics and cleaning.
  • Oxalic Acid: Oxalates or Oxalic acids is a compound occurring in many plants and vegetables. It is also produced in the body by metabolism of glyoxylic acid or ascorbic acid and does not go through metabolism but excreted in the urine. The body is known to absorb oxalic acid from only a handful of foods, including peanuts, pecans, cocoa, guava, rhubarb wheat bran, spinach, beets and beet greens and chocolate.
  • Benzoic acid: A natural source of benzoic acid is gum benzoin, which comes from certain tree barks, but, it can also be made by synthetic means. Benzoic acid is very useful as Preservatives to make food products last longer, and also eradicate harmful yeast and bacteria. Benzoic acid is present in various products, including Cranberries, prunes and plums sauces, jams, jellies and candied fruits.
  • Butyric acid: Butyric acid also known as butanoic acid, is a saturated short-chain fatty acid with a 4-carbon backbone occurring in the form of esters in animal fats and plant oils. Butyrate is produced as end-product of a fermentation process such as, decomposition of butter solely performed by obligate anaerobic bacteria. It is found in milk, especially sheep and buffalo milk, goat, cheese and butter.
  • Lactic acid: This is an organic compound which is white and water-soluble in its solid state and colourless in its liquid state. It is produced both naturally and artificially but naturally present in many foodstuffs via natural fermentation in products such as cheese, yogurt, soy sauce, sourdough, meat products and pickled vegetables. Lactic acid in food products usually serves as either as a pH regulator or as a preservative. It is also used as a flavouring agent.
  • Tannic Acid: Tannic acid, or tannin, is a bitter-tasting compound that is derived from plants. It is the component of red wine or unripe fruit that makes your mouth want to ruck. Grapes contain a high concentration of tannins which is critical to the art of wine making. Other products that contain this acid are Green Tea, nettle, oakwood, berries, Chinese galls, persimmons.
  • Caffeo-tannic Acid: This is a Chlorogenic acid, from coffee, yielding caffeic acid by precipitation with baryta and salts of lead. It is known for relatively lower toxicity and used widely in many other fields like food, feed additives and cosmetics.

Connection Between Gut Health and Inflammation

Your stomach is filled with trillions of living bacteria and yeast which is called your microbiome. In fact, your gut houses eighty percent of your immune system and is often called the body’s second brain. Everything from moods to hormones to weight to genetics falls under the gut’s control.

We all know what we eat impacts our health, but many vastly underestimate the connection between diet and inflammation. Whether you’ve cut your finger or manage an autoimmune disease, no matter what form it takes, inflammation is your body trying to heal itself.

Inflammation in Overdrive

However, while it’s your body’s natural response to injury or disease, inflammation can go into overdrive and become chronic when fighting an ongoing imbalance or deficient lifestyle. There are many changes you can make to start cultivating better gut health, read through our top solutions below.

Leaky Gut

One possible cause of excess inflammation can be damaged intestinal lining. When your gut starts leaking, undigested food particles can pass through and lead to inflammation throughout the body. Eating clean and cutting out some foods we know to be inflammatory for many people like gluten, sugar, and alcohol may be a good place to start. If that doesn’t work, an elimination diet could be the next step toward figuring out what’s triggering your system.

Stress

No matter how exemplary your eating habits are, the healthiest diet cannot overcome excess stress. Chronic stress sabotages your immune system and hampers your body’s ability to heal itself. To combat everyday stressors try taking up practices like yoga, meditation, nature walks or mindfulness.

Foods that Fight Inflammation

Above all, focus on eating as many whole foods as possible. Real, nutrient-packed food is powerful medicine. Cut out processed junk and fast food, and add more plants, healthy fats, nuts, seeds, and fermented foods into your daily meals. You are what you eat, so make sure you’re eating things that enrich your body.